WCC Pukehinau/Lambton

wcclambton

Iona Pannett
Occupation: Wellington City Council
Candidate for: Pukehīnau Lambton
Are you a union member/staff member? Yes, was a member of the PSA before I was elected and have now rejoined.
Have you previously been a union member? If so, when and where? As above.
(for business owners only) Are there union agreements at your business/s?

Question 1)
Do you support a living wage for all staff directly employed by the council? Yes, as a minimum, most staff should be paid more. I have been one of the councillors to actively support Wellington City Council to become a Living Wage employer from the beginning. I am also a strong supporter of the Living Wage movement.

Question 2)
Do you support a living wage for all contractors employed by the council? Yes, as above

Question 3)
Do you support a living wage for all staff employed by the council controlled organisations? Yes, as above

Question 4)
Do you support equal pay claims for relevant council staff (such as library assistants) and would you support working with Unions to advance these claims? Yes

Question 5)
Would you support adapting council procurement policies to positively view contractors with union agreements? Yes, strongly support

Question 6)
Would you support adapting council employment policies to ensure all directly employed, contractors and staff of CCO’s have access to with union membership? Yes, strongly support

Question 7)
Do you support declaring a climate emergency? What role do you think Council can play in preventing climate change and mitigating its effects? Yes, I have already led the Council’s Declaration of a Climate and Ecological emergency in consultation with the community. We declared an emergency on the 20th June 2019. Councils can play a big role in mitigating and adapting to climate change and I have been a leader in this area. We must commit to being net carbon zero as soon as possible.

Council can use it regulatory, funding and policy functions to encourage more people to use public transport, bicycles and to walk more. Building a motorway through the central city will not assist the city to reduce its emissions. The Council also has the ability to build more energy efficient buildings and to encourage other owners to do the same as well as operate more sustainable buildings. The council should not be encouraging more people to fly by building a runway extension and should use technology to communicate with people around the country and the world.

The Council also needs to work with the city to plan to retreat from at risk areas over time and look at building sea walls or dune systems as climate defense mechanisms where appropriate. We also need to make provision for a Climate Defence Fund to fund necessary infrastructure and plan to move to green rather than grey infrastructure to deal with increased stormwater.

Finally, implementing the climate strategy for the city Te Atakura would be of assistance.

Question 8)
Under what circumstances would you support the sale of any council owned assets or organisations (or part thereof)? I do not support the sale of Council assets, particularly strategic ones as they are owned by the public and should stay in public hands. We do sell very small bits of land to homeowners on occasion and I think this is justified if there is no public use for the land.

Question 9)
Do you support the privatization of council services? Would you support bringing currently privatized services back under direct council control? No and I note that supported the retention of the Council’s City Works team and have also supported the bringing in of services for parking and cleaning. I would also note that I support the provision of services to council run by businesses that pay a Living Wage and are environmentally sustainable.

Question 10)
What role do you think council plays in making sure that decent and affordable housing is available for all residents? I believe that Council does have a role to play in providing decent and affordable housing for its residents. I have been proud to be part of a Council that is one of the largest landlords in the country.

I think that we need to take a step change in the way we provide social housing by building some ourselves. This would be paid by borrowing a substantial amount using our balance sheet (we do have capacity to borrow more sensibly).

It is also important that Council works in partnership with iwi, central government and socially responsible developers to provide housing as we don’t have the financial resources to build all the housing we need.

Question 11) (GWRC Candidates only)
Do you support the establishment of a working group with relevant transport unions to regularly consult on aspects of the delivery of regional public transport services?

Question 12) (GWRC Candidates only)
Would you use your position on regional council to seek the repeal of the Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM)?

Question 13)
Can you demonstrate a commitment to working people and progressive politics? (please elaborate up to 200 words)
I have been involved in progressive political causes for over 25 years including working on Te Tiriti claims, working against sexual violence and for a safe and sustainable climate and environment amongst other things. I am also a long standing member of the Green Party where I have served in a number of roles and supported the many progressive policies that the Greens champion.

In terms of my commitment to working people, I have been a strong and committed supporter of the Living Wage movement as above for a number of years and am committed to working for Wellington as a whole to become a Living Wage city as a minimum. I have also been active in helping the city to build more affordable and social housing for those who need it. Finally I have championed the idea of a home for the homeless who are dealing with alcoholism for many years.

I also acknowledge those that aren’t in paid work, in particular, I advocate for those who do unpaid work looking after children and maintaining a household in another role I hold and those who cannot find work for whatever reason.

Question 14)
Is there any further information that we should take into account?

Brian Dawson
Occupation: City Councillor
Candidate for: WCC Lambton – Pukehīnau Ward
Are you a union member/staff member? No
Have you previously been a union member? If so, when and where? Yes. Post Office Workers (1980s) Railways ((1980s)
(for business owners only) Are there union agreements at your business/s?

Question 1)
Do you support a living wage for all staff directly employed by the council? Yes

Question 2)
Do you support a living wage for all contractors employed by the council?
Yes

Question 3)
Do you support a living wage for all staff employed by the council controlled organisations?
Yes
Question 4)
Do you support equal pay claims for relevant council staff (such as library assistants) and would you support working with Unions to advance these claims?
Yes

Question 5)
Would you support adapting council procurement policies to positively view contractors with union agreements?
Yes

Question 6)
Would you support adapting council employment policies to ensure all directly employed, contractors and staff of CCO’s have access to with union membership?
Yes

Question 7)
Do you support declaring a climate emergency? What role do you think Council can play in preventing climate change and mitigating its effects?
Yes, as long as we are working towards a ‘Just Transition’ that does not overly burden the vulnerable.
Council has plenty of scope to address climate change at numerous levels

Question 8)
Under what circumstances would you support the sale of any council owned assets or organisations (or part thereof)?
Highly unlikely to support such sales.

Question 9)
Do you support the privatization of council services? Would you support bringing currently privatized services back under direct council control?
Yes and yes
Question 10)
What role do you think council plays in making sure that decent and affordable housing is available for all residents?
Council has several crucial roles. Firstly as the biggest social housing provider, secondly as a regulator with power to ensure building can and is happening and thirdly as a body that can intervene – as is happening in the rental market with apartment conversions.

Question 11) (GWRC Candidates only)
Do you support the establishment of a working group with relevant transport unions to regularly consult on aspects of the delivery of regional public transport services?

Question 12) (GWRC Candidates only)
Would you use your position on regional council to seek the repeal of the Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM)?

Question 13)
Can you demonstrate a commitment to working people and progressive politics? (please elaborate upto 200 words)
I spent some years involved with the Living Wage Movement, including as Wellington spokesperson and national board member. When I was elected I was the first councillor to hold the Living Wage portfolio and progressed the work towards Wellington becoming the first Living Wage Council in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Tamatha Paul

Occupation:President, Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association (full-time)

Candidate for:Pukehīnau Lambton Ward
Are you a union member/staff member?

Yes
Have you previously been a union member? If so, when and where?

I was a member of Unite Union from 2013-2015 when I worked at KFC through high school, then a member of the TEU when I worked at the New Zealand Union of Students’ Association from 2016-2017
(for business owners only) Are there union agreements at your business/s?

Our organisation’s staff members are members of the TEU, and we also coordinate our Student Media’s Collective Employment Agreement with E Tū. We also work to unionise our students who are employed by the University such as Tutors and Residential Advisors, but that’s a work in progress.

Question 1)

Do you support a living wage for all staff directly employed by the council?

Yes, it is one of my main policies – A Living Wage City

Question 2)
Do you support a living wage for all contractors employed by the council?

Absolutely yes!

Question 3)
Do you support a living wage for all staff employed by the council controlled organisations?

Yes!

Question 4)

Do you support equal pay claims for relevant council staff (such as library assistants) and would you support working with Unions to advance these claims?

Absolutely.

Question 5)
Would you support adapting council procurement policies to positively view contractors with union agreements?

Yes.

Question 6)
Would you support adapting council employment policies to ensure all directly employed, contractors and staff of CCO’s have access to with union membership?

Yes.

Question 7)
Do you support declaring a climate emergency? What role do you think Council can play in preventing climate change and mitigating its effects?

Yes. I have a comprehensive environmental policy package. Transport is Wellington’s biggest emitter of carbon, therefore it’s imperative that we incentivise reliable, affordable and accessible public transport so we can get people out of their cars and into trains, buses, bikes and footpaths. We also need to have climate change at the forefront of every single decision we make, whether it be around the Mt. Vic Tunnel, extending the airport, developing Shelly Bay, or seismic strengthening of the Central Library.

Climate change will not be something we overcome and then resume life as normal. It will require a sustained – but supported – change to our everyday lifestyles, and to cater to intergenerational sustainability I am pushing for a Zero Waste Wellington. This means getting our recycling system working again, investing in urban agriculture like Kaicycle, supporting and investing in community composting and recycling initiatives and making Wellington City Council go plastic free.

Question 8)

Under what circumstances would you support the sale of any council owned assets or organisations (or part thereof)?

It would depend on the context and information available.

Question 9)
Do you support the privatization of council services? Would you support bringing currently privatized services back under direct council control?

I’m neutral on this. I’m not for it and I’m not against it. I’d need more information, for example if WCC was wasting ratepayers money delivering a service we didn’t have the infrastructure to provide then it could be considered. But I do believe that services are stronger and more effective if owned and operated by Council because then the public have direct input and accountability mechanisms to have some say on how the service is delivered.

Question 10)
What role do you think council plays in making sure that decent and affordable housing is available for all residents?

I think WCC could play a bigger role if Central Government relinquished and decentralised some of their resources, but I think in terms of “decent” housing – Council can and should play a role in monitoring and enforcing the Healthy Home Standards. In terms of affordable housing, we need more social housing but also I think our hands are largely tied by what is happening at the National Level. Considering Wellington homes nearly 20,000 tertiary students and directly accommodates ~4,000 tertiary students in the Central City, I think there could and should be more collaboration between the Universities and the Council in order to get thousands of people out of the rental market and into University accommodation, so long as the accommodation is decent and reliable, that is.

Question 11) (GWRC Candidates only)
Do you support the establishment of a working group with relevant transport unions to regularly consult on aspects of the delivery of regional public transport services?

Absolutely, I think the number of workers from within the transport industry who are currently standing for GWRC are a testament to this. My dad works in the transport industry, and the knowledge/insight that these people have is seriously underutilised at the moment. Woops I just read I wasn’t supposed to answer this but I’m gonna leave it here anyway lol

Question 12) (GWRC Candidates only)
Would you use your position on regional council to seek the repeal of the Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM)?

Question 13)
Can you demonstrate a commitment to working people and progressive politics? (please elaborate upto 200 words)

My mum is a caregiver, my dad is a truck driver. I currently represent 20,000 tertiary students in Wellington – many of whom are all working while they study. I, too, worked two jobs during high school in fast food and bartending, and during University as a graphic designer and community organiser.

I stand with workers. We are the lifeforce of our City’s bustling public and private sectors, and without us, the Capital would fall apart. We have a Living Wage accredited Council with Wellington NZ (WREDA) moving towards accreditation. But I believe we can accomplish a Living Wage CITY.

We should use our influence to encourage big businesses to become Living Wage accredited, like Westpac. We should utilise social procurement to support our Living Wage accredited local and big businesses, given the extent of services delivered by WCC. We should incentivise LW accreditation through waiving or discounting Council fees on business.

Question 14)
Is there any further information that we should take into account?

I’m a Union thug lol nah but I I will always fight for the underdog. I will always carry the flag of everyday, working class people because that is where my heart is and always will be, and I will never apologise for that.

 

Lee Orchard

Occupation: Public Servant
Candidate for: Pukehīnau/Lambton Ward
Are you a union member/staff member? Yes, in the PSA.
Have you previously been a union member? If so, when and where? PSA, Wellington.
(for business owners only) Are there union agreements at your business/s? Yes, there is a collective agreement that was recently ratified with PSA.

Question 1)

Do you support a living wage for all staff directly employed by the council?

Yes.

Question 2)
Do you support a living wage for all contractors employed by the council?

Yes.

Question 3)
Do you support a living wage for all staff employed by the council controlled organisations?

Yes.

Question 4)

Do you support equal pay claims for relevant council staff (such as library assistants) and would you support working with Unions to advance these claims?

Yes. Yes, I would collaborate with the unions to better understand and advance these claims, where possible.

Question 5)
Would you support adapting council procurement policies to positively view contractors with union agreements?
I am not quite sure what a councillor’s limitations of influence are in this, but yes, I would certainly explore and advocate for this operational change.
Question 6)
Would you support adapting council employment policies to ensure all directly employed, contractors and staff of CCO’s have access to with union membership?

Yes.

Question 7)
Do you support declaring a climate emergency? What role do you think Council can play in preventing climate change and mitigating its effects?

The council has already. However, yes, as long as it is not symbolic and is more than virtue-signalling. The council can do a lot to prevent and mitigate the effects of climate change, especially in its operation. Examples include, reducing its own emissions, making low-carbon options easy for people to use: such as better options for recycling and composting; and transport, such as walking, cycling and mass transit and transport; planning for denser living and building strong, resilient buildings. The council can lead by example, and influence local businesses to do the same.

Question 8)

Under what circumstances would you support the sale of any council owned assets or organisations (or part thereof)?

Only with public consultation and all proper considerations made; in circumstances where the sale was strategic and clearly to the benefit of the city’s residents, transparent, evidence based, and with the long term in mind.

Question 9)
Do you support the privatization of council services? Would you support bringing currently privatized services back under direct council control?

Yes, but only in certain conditions. It is sometimes necessary because the council cannot provide the service itself. If this were the case, I’d advocate for these services being provided by a company that has fair pay and work conditions for all of its employees and is procured in a robust and ethical way.

Yes, if it were a strategic action that would contribute to improved outcomes for the city, but not at the cost of those providing the service. E.g. fair pay and conditions.

I would ensure a fair, transparent, and collaborative approach for either of these actions, were they to occur.

Question 10)
What role do you think council plays in making sure that decent and affordable housing is available for all residents?

It is the role of the Council to provide affordable housing for people with low incomes and special housing needs. It does this through managing the portfolio of properties it owns, and working alongside the wider housing and social support sectors to ensure suitable and affordable housing is available. The council also performs the role of having a long-term focus to continue to provide subsidised housing for those most in need. Like any housing provider, the council also manages their portfolio prudently, ensuring that housing is in the right place, and kept in good condition.

Question 11) (GWRC Candidates only)
Do you support the establishment of a working group with relevant transport unions to regularly consult on aspects of the delivery of regional public transport services?

Question 12) (GWRC Candidates only)
Would you use your position on regional council to seek the repeal of the Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM)?

Question 13)
Can you demonstrate a commitment to working people and progressive politics? (please elaborate up to 200 words)

The perfect opportunity to demonstrate both would be as a councillor. However, most recently, and for a while now, my public sector work has demonstrated my commitment to working people and progressive politics (despite the constraints). The main reason I entered the public service is to improve outcomes for the New Zealand people. As long as I have been able to afford union membership, I’ve been a member. I’ve contributed to bargaining as a member, shared messaging to my colleagues (members or not) and always acted to promote the interests of workers, regardless of their job.

An essential aspect of progressive politics to me is that which advances the welfare and prosperity of the working class. I believe we all have a role to play in achieving this.

Question 14)
Is there any further information that we should take into account?

Yes. A lot of electioneering thus far, at least within the WCC election, has been on either global issues or issues outside WCC’s control. Yes, WCC’s work does contribute to, and need to consider, these but the conversation needs to come back to a local and community level. Candidates who have either central party affiliation or support are also pedalling central party policies that WCC have little or no control over. It is a detraction from what matters; that at a local level which the council actually have control over, such as housing, road design, water quality, and working conditions for its staff and contractors.

If elected, I will focus on what WCC has control over, and what can (and needs to be) given priority so that we can begin to make the desperate change the city needs and all enjoy a better quality of life.

Please don’t vote for a candidate just because they are familiar to you. Vote based on the knowledge, experience, and skillset they bring to the role. Vote based on someone who will relentlessly advocate for those critically urgent actions, those we can afford, and those that will make the biggest impact on our quality of life and that of future generations. Let’s get the basics right first.

 

Nicola Young
Occupation: Writer & city councillor
Candidate for: Wellington City Council; Lambton Ward
Are you a union member/staff member? No
Have you previously been a union member? If so, when and where? Yes. Journalists’ union (NZ) 1974-76; National Union of Journalists (UK) 1976-1978
(for business owners only) Are there union agreements at your business/s? N/A

I am committed to working in the best interests of Wellingtonians, ensuring our city remains affordable for all. The forecast rates increase of 50% over the next 10 years will price people out of our city, especially for those on pensions, fixed and low incomes. My priorities for Wellington are: keeping rates in check; focusing on core infrastructure (better bus services, tackling congestion, water networks, the Central Library and Civic Square); championing our arts and culture; having more laneway upgrades that breathe life into the central city and make the city safe; and advocating for Central Wellington, responding to constituent queries and helping to get their problems solved.

The City Council’s focus on delivery will ensure Wellingtonians continue to have high quality employment opportunities, with good pay and conditions.

Climate change is a serious issue, but it needs meaningful action – not empty virtue signalling. Wellington City Council is the city’s largest generator of single-use plastic bags, we sponsor Singapore Airlines flights to Australia, and 80% of our emissions come from the Council-owned Southern Landfill. My colleagues voted to declare a ‘climate emergency’; I was the only councillor to call out this hypocrisy.

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